Roman Empire architecture

November 4, 2013
Roman fort ruins, hadrian s

Laura Nasrallah argues that early Christian literature addressed to Greeks and Romans is best understood when read in tandem with the archaeological remains of Roman antiquity. She examines second-century Christianity by looking at the world in which Christians “lived and moved and had their being.” Early Christians were not divorced from the materiality of the world, nor did they always remain distant from the Greek culture of the time or the rhetoric of Roman power. Nasrallah shows how early Christians took up themes of justice, piety, and even the question of whether humans could be gods. They did so in the midst of sculptures that conveyed visually that humans could be gods, monumental architecture that made claims about the justice and piety of the Roman imperial family, and ideas of geography that placed Greek or Roman ethnicity at the center of the known world.

  • Brings together early Christian literature with Roman art and architecture
  • Offers a new understanding of early Christian apologies
  • Introduces early Christian historians to cutting edge research in Roman history and art

Reviews & endorsements

"...provocative, convincing book... A must read for scholars and students of early Christianity, classics, and ancient history. Essential." -Choice

Source: www.cambridge.org
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